Jane Eaton Hamilton

"At the bottom of the box is hope." – Ellis Avery.

Tag: NY Times

About Us: Essays from the NY Times Disability Series

 

I’m happy to say I have an essay coming out in this fall collection on disability. You can pre-order now. Here is the link to the book at Amazon.ca. Here is the link for Amazon.com. Here is the Publisher’s Weekly review:

“In this exquisite collection drawn from the Times essays series started in 2016, disability is, refreshingly, seen as a part of daily life, even as the contributors discuss facing a “world that does not expect us and is often not made for us.” Ona Gritz, who has right hemiplegia, a form of cerebral palsy, recalls asking a literary agent who suggested she write a memoir, “Would I have to be disabled on every page?” Coeditor Garland-Thomson, having learning her asymmetrical hands and forearms are caused by complex syndactyly, an exceptionally rare genetic condition, no longer feels like an “orphan” but part of a “world of disability pride and advocacy.” Similarly, the late Oliver Sacks finds value in his disability, an increasing loss of hearing, enjoying how “in the realm of mishearing… a biography of cancer can become a biography of Cantor (one of my favorite mathematicians)… and mere mention of Christmas Eve a command to ‘Kiss my feet!’ ” The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act comes up often throughout, making fully clear the turning point it represented. Demonstrating, above all, the value of persistence, Catapano and Garland-Thomson’s anthology merits a spot on everyone’s reading list for its brilliant assemblage of voices and stories. (Sept.)” Publisher’s Weekly

Kirkus Review calls it “A rich, moving collection.”

NY Times archive: writers on writing for the Times

author Rosellen Brown

Sometimes the only thing that helps when you are a writer is to read other writers’ takes on how this mysterious profession plays out for them. Here is a list of the columns the NY Times has published over the years. Happy reading!

Writers on Writing

Celebrations of Womxn on IWD 2018

In Canada, a woman other than Queen Elizabeth II is finally on our currency in a $10 bill that will go into circulation later this year. Not quite certain of why we can’t replace all the men all at once and for as long as women have been excluded, but I guess it’s a first step. Read all about Viola Desmond, the Black Nova Scotian jailed for sitting in the white section of a movie theatre years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat, here:

Viola Desmond, Canadian hero

_________________

For decades, I read the Globe and Mail daily, and when I turned to the obit section, I would see that in Canada only white heterosexual men ever died, and I’d always breathe a sigh of relief. If they kept on being the only Canadians succumbing, well then, the rest of us might live long enough to see equality. Hope the Globe sees fit to do exactly what the Times is doing:

At the NY Times, obits have been dominated by white men–as selectors, as subjects. Today, they unveil a new column, Overlooked, to redress the problem. I’ve reprinted the introduction here. Follow the links as the stories are fascinating and well worth your investment of time.

Overlooked

Obituary writing is more about life than death: the last word, a testament to a human contribution.

Yet who gets remembered — and how — inherently involves judgment. To look back at the obituary archives can, therefore, be a stark lesson in how society valued various achievements and achievers.

Since 1851, The New York Times has published thousands of obituaries: of heads of state, opera singers, the inventor of Stove Top stuffing and the namer of the Slinky. The vast majority chronicled the lives of men, mostly white ones; even in the last two years, just over one in five of our subjects were female.

Charlotte Brontë wrote “Jane Eyre”; Emily Warren Roebling oversaw construction of the Brooklyn Bridge when her husband fell ill; Madhubala transfixed Bollywood; Ida B. Wells campaigned against lynching. Yet all of their deaths went unremarked in our pages, until now.

Below you’ll find obituaries for these and others who left indelible marks but were nonetheless overlooked. We’ll be adding to this collection each week, as Overlooked becomes a regular feature in the obituaries section, and expanding our lens beyond women.

You can use this form to nominate candidates for future “Overlooked” obits. Read an essay from our obituaries editor about how he approaches subjects and learn more about how the project came to be.”

Skinning the Rabbit, The Sun Magazine

I got home from a trip, picked up my mail and found my contributor copies of the July 2017 issue of The Sun Magazine (along with the welcome cheque). A couple of weeks ago, I went to add The Sun to my list of places I’ve published, and it was already there. I was puzzled; I didn’t remember having already added it. But then I explored a little further, realized I’d published there a long time ago, and sought out the issue, the cover of which is above. I was bemused to find that the subject matter was quite similar to the recent essay since I haven’t written about my childhood in ages.

Here’s that original and second-person story, which was still on my desktop: Hearts

My piece this time around is called Skinning the Rabbit. I explored my relationship with my father through our collision about animal welfare, and through the bullying I experienced when I got alopecia totalis at six. I hope you like it. Tell me if you do, k? It’s not online, but you can find The Sun almost anywhere that carries literate magazines, even in Canada.

I am proud to have had essays in the NY Times and The Sun this year.

The Sun November 1993

 

 

 

 

Do blue butterflies eat parts of the sky?

NY Times

This stunning piece of filmmaking brought me to tears. I hope you’ll watch this and be as moved as I was. Answering these questions is one of our most sacred trusts.

“What is kind?”

“Can girls be robots?”

“How do you make water?”

“Why do boys cut their hair?”

 

Am I Too Embarrassed to Save My Life? My essay in the NY Times

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-12-31-17-pm

Am I Too Embarrassed to Save My Life?

NY Times

I’m told it had over a hundred thousand hits. I hope to have a few things to say here that answer some people’s questions. If you would like to leave additional questions or remarks here, I will try to include them.

Ann Beattie’s favourite short fictions

Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 8.23.25 PM

I grew into a writer as an admirer of Ann Beattie’s astringent, generous short fiction. Here’s a recent NY Times interview.

Ann Beattie

In the meantime, here is a list of her most-loved short stories with, indeed, some of my favourites among them:

“What are your all-time favorite short stories?

Among them: “Twilight of the Superheroes” and “Your Duck Is My Duck,” by Deborah Eisenberg; “Way Down Deep in the Jungle,” by Thom Jones; “Oxygen,” by Ron Carlson; “Nettles” and “The Albanian Virgin,” by Alice Munro; “The Fat Girl,” by Andre Dubus; “We Didn’t,” by Stuart Dybek; “Tits-Up in a Ditch,” by Annie Proulx; “Bruns,” by Norman Rush; “Escapes,” by Joy Williams; “Yours,” by Mary Robison; “The Dog of the Marriage,” by Amy Hempel; “The Fireman’s Wife,” by Richard Bausch; “The Womanizer,” by Richard Ford; “Helping,” by Robert Stone; “No Place for You, My Love,” by Eudora Welty; “Are These Actual Miles,” by Raymond Carver; “People Like That Are The Only People Here,” by Lorrie Moore; “Last Night,” by James Salter; “Sarah Cole: A Type of Love Story,” by Russell Banks; “Hunters in the Snow,” by Tobias Wolff; Rebecca Lee’s collection, “Bobcat.””

Make sure that’s a white sand beach you’re lying on this summer

Screen Shot 2015-05-25 at 1.44.35 PM

Thank goodness we have people that will mock idiocy like this.  But why do we have idiocy like this to begin with?

NY Times summer reading list:  ALL WHITE

Cheryl Strayed and the double standards for women’s writing

JEHhand

sketch: Jane Eaton Hamilton 2006

Women understand there’s a glass floor on which male authors walk, while women walk below on a separate tier with its own glass floor, while on a third tier down walk queer women writers and writers of colour.  But Cheryl Strayed puts it infinitely better than I could:

Is There a Double Standard for Judging Domestic Themes in Fiction?

A second link to an essay by Meg Wolitzer on the same topic:

On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women

All the lost novels

IMG_9812

As someone who’s abandoned, I believe, 9 novels over the years, I appreciated this article.

Lost Novels

Congrats! It’s a 6 pound

James Agee’s text and Walker Evans’ photography redux

“On Tuesday Melville House will publish Agee’s original, unprinted 30,000-word article in book form, under the title “Cotton Tenants: Three Families.” The publication gives Agee fans a glimpse of an early draft of what became a seminal work of American literature.”

Cotton Tenants

 

The Arrival of Horses–a Christmas story, of sorts

This morning, the NY Times published an article on the west’s ongoing trouble with wild horses, the yearly culls, and the diminishing numbers of private adoptions of culled horses as the price of hay rises.   I am deeply sorry to hear that this issue is still with us.

I wrote this story a long time ago, but it transpires in this milieu, in the American west, with guns, to a family trapped on both sides of the issue, at Christmas time.

The article about the issue appears here first, and then my story appears here afterwards.  Please let me know if you’ve read it by leaving a comment here.

Wild Horses

THEARRIVALOFHORSES_JEH

David Rakoff

David Rakoff has died.  We have lost this brilliant, mordant wit.

www.nytimes.com/2012/08/11/books/david-rakoff-award-winning-humorist-dies-at-47.html?_r=1&ref=booksandliterature

The Nabokovs

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/22/books/review/his-fathers-best-translator.html?_r=2&pagewanted=all

An anthology on Central Park for all we NYC-o-philes

I used to live in NYC in the seventies, park block on W 85th, and the green space, for a girl from a farm in southern Ontario, was respite and solace.  I’m glad for this collection.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/06/books/central-park-an-anthology-edited-by-andrew-blauner.html?_r=1&ref=booksandliterature

%d bloggers like this: