Jane Eaton Hamilton

"It was her mouth that had a hand over it, not her eyes." -Jane Eaton Hamilton

Category: awards

CBC poetry longlist 2018! Congrats to the longlist!

Congrats to the poets on the longlist! I’m delighted to be included with so many talented writers.

CBC poetry prize longlist 2018

Prism International longlist

 

I’m delighted to be longlisted for the:

2018 Jacob Zilber Prize for Short Fiction

Thanks, Prism! Congrats, longlist!

In no particular order:

 

A Girl’s Guide to the End of the World by Elle Wild (Bowen Island, BC)

Baptism of Alleluia Gomez by Michael Mendonez (Pemberton, NJ)

North Coast, Late Sixties, with Soundtrack by Jane Kinegal (Vancouver, BC)

Bodies in Trouble by Diane Carley (St John’s, NL)

She Figures That by Rachael Lesosky (Victoria, BC)

Sisters on a Quest by Mi-Kyung Shin (New York, NY)

Hawthorne Yellow Lisa Alward (Fredericton, NB)

Pooka by Angelique Lalonde (Hazelton, BC)

Ursa Minor by Quinn Mason (Montreal, QC)

Whiteout January by Jessica Waite (Calgary, AB)

Chosen by Marilyn Abildskov (Emeryville, CA)

Potlatch Returns to Wazhashk Creek by D.A. Lockhart (Windsor, ON)

Catch by Jennifer Dickieson (Vancouver, BC)

A Wager by Gord Grisenthwaite (Kingsville, ON)

The Gravity of Rocks by Jane Eaton Hamilton (Salt Spring, BC)

The ReLit Awards “The country’s pre-eminent literary prize recognizing independent presses.” -The Globe & Mail

Today ‘Weekend’ was long shortlisted for the ReLit Awards. Congrats also to Ashley Little for Niagara Motel, also through Arsenal Pulp, and the other finalists in the three categories of novel, short fiction and poetry.

The ReLit Awards

The Dayne Ogilve Prize 2017

I’m pleased to say that our three finalists for the 2017 Dayne Ogilvie Prize, a $4000 award to an emerging LGBTQ author admininstered by the Writer’s Trust, were announced this week. I was pleased and honoured to have spent the last three months engrossed in our longlist reads with Elio Iannacci and Trish Salah. We have such a prolific and talented community, and you all to a one make me so proud. It was a great honour to read you. The ceremony announcing the winner will take place in concert with the Writer’s Union of Canada AGM and is open to the public, 5 pm Sat June 3 at SFU Harbourfront, with last year’s winner Leah Horlick presenting the award.

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The 2017 CBC Short Story Prize longlist

I’m thrilled to say that I join 27 talented writers on the CBC Short Story Prize longlist! Woo hoo! Special kudos to Alix Hawley who has two longlisted entries this year! Congrats, everyone, and thanks to the judges.

CBC Short Story Prize Longlist 2017

Smiley, my 2014 winning story

Interview with CBC about Smiley

The Sellout by Paul Beatty

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The Sellout won the Man Booker Prize in 2016 and in light of what the US is facing down now, I think we all need to read it if we haven’t already.

The Sellout

Published by Oneworld 

Born in the ‘agrarian ghetto’ of Dickens on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles and raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, the narrator of The Sellout spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe his father’s pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family’s financial woes. But when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realises there never was a memoir. All that’s left is the bill for a drive-through funeral.

Fuelled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California from further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town’s most famous resident – Hominy Jenkins – he initiates the most outrageous action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school which lands him in the Supreme Court.

What follows is a remarkable journey that challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement and the holy grail of racial equality – the black Chinese restaurant.

Best American Essays Notable

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Thrilled to have an essay chosen as one of the notable essays of the year in Best American Essays 2016, ed Jonathan Franzen. I rarely write non-fiction so it’s a doubly pleasing honour for me. I once had a story chosen as a notable story in Best American Short Stories, and a poem will come out this year in Best Canadian Poetry, so the cross-genre’ing pleases me. Now, the substantial pleasure of reading these celebrated essays!

Never Say I Didn’t Bring You Flowers, Full Grown People, ed Jennifer Niesslein

Nominate a Canadian writer today!

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Nominate a Canadian writer today for the 2016 Writers’ Trust Fellowship! “Writers will be considered without regard to commercial success or whether or not they have been or are likely to be recipients of other literary honours.” The deadline is May 20, and it’s a pretty easy nomination process. What a gift it will be!

Writers’ Trust Fellowship

Lit POP awards, Montreal!

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I wasn’t well enough to attend, but my kid is there in my stead. Thanks, Meghann, LitPOP, George Saunders and Matrix Magazine, for choosing my piece “Battery” as your 2015 fiction winner! And congrats again to Michael Prior, poetry winner.

“It’s fast, funny, precise in its language. The author is really using  language as a tool of persuasion. The story also has real heart – the  narrator manages to make us sympathize for both chickens and  executioners. The details of the operation are chilling and terrific.  The story is beautifully shaped and minimal – the writer seems to  recognize that the essence of making a work of art is choosing. The  story makes us face a certain harsh truth, but without any sense of  preaching, and even a sense of wonder. Above all, the story is musical –  it zings along, making a world as it goes, with its confidence and its  sense of curiosity.” –George Saunders

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CBC CNF longlist

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Happy to say that my piece “Battery” made it to this year’s CBC creative nonfiction shortlist. Sad to say that I had to withdraw it when it won Lit Pop. Congrats to everyone on the longlist and good luck to you all going forward!

 

Lit Pop, Montreal

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chick with docked beak

I entered this competition on the off-chance hope of having George Saunders read my work–as a lark, in other words. The good news was just announced–I won for fiction, and Michael Prior won for poetry. Congrats, Michael. I’m grateful to Lit Pop and the judges, and most of all, to George Saunders for his generosity in choosing my piece “Battery,” a hybrid fiction/cnf work, and for his great comments.

“George Saunders says congratulations and:

I admired and enjoyed the wit, clarity, and compression of this story. It’s fast, funny, precise in its language. The author is really using language as a tool of persuasion. The story also has real heart – the narrator manages to make us sympathize for both chickens and executioners. The details of the operation are chilling and terrific. The story is beautifully shaped and minimal – the writer seems to recognize that the essence of making a work of art is choosing. The story makes us face a certain harsh truth, but without any sense of preaching, and even a sense of wonder. Above all, the story is musical – it zings along, making a world as it goes, with its confidence and its sense of curiosity.”

The piece is a story about a newborn chick in a factory farm as it has its beak docked. It is routine for chicks to have one-third of their beaks amputated without anesthetic. It would be stellar if this piece could play some small part in erradicating the torture-chambers that are factory farms.

George Saunders’ most recent book, Tenth of December (stories), was published in 2014, was a National Book Award finalist, and was named one of the best books of the year by People, The New York Times Magazine, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, New York, The Telegraph, BuzzFeed, Kirkus Reviews, BookPage, and Shelf Awareness. He is also the author of Pastoralia and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline, both New York Times Notable Books, and The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip, a New York Times children’s bestseller. In 2000, The New Yorker named him one of the “Best Writers Under 40.” He writes regularly for The New Yorker and Harper’s, as well as Esquire, GQ, and The New York Times Magazine. He won a National Magazine Award for Fiction in 2004 and his work is included in Best American Short Stories 2005. He teaches at Syracuse University.

Bristol Short Story Contest shortlist, UK

“It is with great pleasure that we announce the shortlist for the 2015 Bristol Short Story Prize. The 20 stories on the list will 2015 BS8 flyerbe published in the 8th Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology and are in the running for the £1,000 first prize. As in previous years we have been extremely fortunate to work with a fantastic panel of judges – we raise a glass and give thanks to the mighty Sara Davies, Rowan Lawton, Sanjida O’Connell and Nikesh Shukla for their extraordinary conscientiousness and enthusiasm, and for putting together what will be a wonderful anthology.

Chair of the judging panel and former BBC Radio 4 producer, Sara Davies, says:

“This year once again there were nearly two and a half thousand entries to the competition: a fantastic response, and a huge task for the readers who between them drew up a longlist of forty varied, challenging, wide-ranging and moving stories. They did a brilliant job; all forty were exciting to read, and deciding on just twenty for the shortlist was far from easy.

“One of the biggest pleasures in reading the longlist was the global spread of the entries: stories had come in from all over the English-speaking world, and their subjects ranged from the small and seemingly domestic to the big issues around political upheaval, immigration and war. There was much to admire, and much to enjoy, and we deliberated long and hard about which twenty we felt should go forward. We looked for those stories that stayed with us after reading, that we could return to with pleasure, and that rewarded close attention. Our commiserations go to those disappointed longlisted writers who didn’t make it through to the shortlist; your stories made it through some tough competition and gave us a lot of pleasure. Our congratulations to those twenty who will be published in the 8th Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology; we were really excited to find such a range of storytelling talent. And a big thank you to every writer of the two and a half thousand who entered; keep writing those stories and send them in next year!”

The winner of the 2015 Bristol Short Story Prize will be announced at our awards ceremony in October. The 2nd and 3rd place prize winners will also be revealed on the night and the Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology Volume 8 will be launched.”

 

2015 Bristol Short Story Prize shortlist (listed A-Z by author)

 

The Plait – Michael Bird (Romania)

A Tough New Policy at the Food Pantry – Lisa K Buchanan (USA)

Magpie – Gina Challen (England)

Justice – Florence Delaney (England)

Just After We Stopped Talking – Chris Edwards-Pritchard (England)

The River of Running Sand – Jane Eaton Hamilton (Canada)

Airtight – Mark Illis (England)

Between the Pickles – J.R. McConvey (Canada)

Stafford Street – Riona Judge McCormack (South Africa)

Birthday Bones – Magdalena McGuire (Australia)

The Ice Ages – Paul McMichael (Ireland)

Black Lines – Fiona Mitchell (England)

The Guest House – Candy Neubert (England)

House of Doors – P.K.Read (France)

Marbles – Penny Simpson (Wales)

The Changeling – Emma Staughton (England)

Flowers – Emma Timpany (England)

A Week on the Water – Brent van Staalduinen (Canada)

Natural Order – Alison Wray (England)

The Zoo – Jeremy Charles Yang (England)

Fictive Lit Poppery at Matrix

JEHsketch

sketch: Jane Eaton Hamilton 2014

So glad to be in fine company on the short list for 2015’s Lit Pop in Montreal, sponsored by Matrix magazine. Thanks, George Saunders.

LIT POP SHORTLIST ANNOUNCEMENT

POP Montreal and Matrix Magazine are pleased to announce the 2015 shortlists:

FICTION SHORTLIST

André Babyn of Toronto, ON

Jill Talbot of Gabriola Island, BC

Marina Mularz of Crystal Lake, IL

Jane Eaton Hamilton of Vancouver, BC

Felipe Torres Medina  of New York, NY

POETRY SHORTLIST

Kasandra Larsen of New Orleans, LA

Jennifer Lovegrove of Toronto, ON

Rebecca Salazar of Fredericton, NB

Aimee Herman of New York, NY

Michael Prior  of Ithica, NY

The winners will be announced on Monday, August 3rd, 2015

About our judges:

George Saunders’s most recent book, Tenth of December (stories), was published in 2014, was a National Book Award finalist, and was named one of the best books of the year by People, The New York Times Magazine, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, New York, The Telegraph, BuzzFeed, Kirkus Reviews, BookPage, and Shelf Awareness. He is also the author of Pastoralia and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline, both New York Times Notable Books, and The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip, a New York Times children’s bestseller. In 2000, The New Yorker named him one of the “Best Writers Under 40.” He writes regularly for The New Yorker and Harper’s, as well as Esquire, GQ, and The New York Times Magazine. He won a National Magazine Award for Fiction in 2004 and his work is included in Best American Short Stories 2005. He teaches at Syracuse University.

Originally from the Detroit area, Damian Rogers now lives in Toronto where she works as the poetry editor of both House of Anansi Press and The Walrus, and as the creative director of Poetry in Voice, a national recitation contest for Canadian high-school students. Her first book of poems, Paper Radio, was nominated for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award.

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Congrats to Lisa Foad and Nicholas Ruddock for winning!

Prize for a first book of fiction by a woman

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A woman from anywhere in the world is eligible to send a work of fiction.  The prize is $1K.

More info here:

Eludia Award

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