Jane Eaton Hamilton

"It was her mouth that had a hand over it, not her eyes." -Jane Eaton Hamilton

Category: articles by others

How to Grieve For Your Friend and Mentor, by Amy Jo Burns

image from LitHub

Have you loved and lost a mentor? This is a hollow spot, and we need to write through it. As this terrible year ends, I read this essay by Amy Jo Burns on Alexander Chee, Sigrid Nunez, and Writing After Death. You might like to, too.

How to Grieve For Your Friend and Mentor

Buy These Books

photo: Maria Dahvana Headley photo by Beowulf Sheehan

While you are prevaricating with summer reads, consider ordering in these lovelies from your local bookseller, from Electric Lit, so you’ll be set up for early fall:

By the Electric Light

Anna March–yeah, no. And other scams:

Anna March

Anna March, literary gadabout and organizer in the US, has been exposed as a fraud with a storied history of taking financial and emotional advantage of writers (and others pre-her writing career). Anna and I were FB friends, and gradually grew closer. I hoped one day we’d meet in person. I got involved with Roar Magazine when she began it the week of the presidential inauguration, when Anna asked me to do a regular column. I was thrilled to be able to write regularly for a periodical I assumed I would love. It was something great coming on the terrible weighty shoulders of UBCA and Trumpet, and I hoped it would signal that the year was turning around–if not for imperilled Americans who would roll and march their bodies onto the front line to protest or for womxn students in Canada, then for me, personally. I wrote several columns, sent two, and Anna also bought some reprints. I know it won’t surprise you to hear that I never received payment, despite invoicing. Surprise, surprise, on its one-year anniversary, Roar folded with debts.

The only good thing was that I ended my involvement with Roar and Anna March early on when a friend ratted her out. It broke my heart, honestly. I’d really liked her. I thought she was doing good things in the world. I thought I could be a part of that. Even when her story went wonky–when, say, her only presence on the Binders was to solicit $–I wanted to believe in it, in her. And why would anyone scam writers/artists? We barely make it through a good month. But, yet, I had incontrovertible proof, lots of it, in front of me. She was everything the LA Times has confirmed today that she is. I’m glad the news is finally out in order that no one else ever gets scammed. But I’m also sad with the sadness that hasn’t really gone away since the US election and UBCA.

Thanks, Melissa Chadburn and Carolyn Kellogg. I appreciate you going to the wall.

Literary ambition. Fabulous parties. A hidden past. Who is Anna March?

Maribeth Fischer wrote an essay (perhaps) based on Anna March at the Yale Review in 2012. I read it 15 months ago, thinking it was published as fiction. You can find an excerpt here:

Maribeth Fischer: The Fiction Writer

Here is one about JT Le Roy, a traumatized teen author who turned out to be a 40 yo woman:

The Boy Who Cried Author

Avoid Blogging Course Scams

BBB warning on same author

Edited to add:

Another recent scam outside of literature:

“As an Added Bonus, She Paid for Everything”: My Bright-Lights Misadventure with a Magician of Manhattan

 

Writing Through Disability; Sonya Huber at LitHub

Writing With and Through Pain

by Sonya Huber

“The Key is to Not Panic in the Face of this Void”

The talented, skilled and disabled Sonya Huber, author of the stunning “Pain Woman Takes Your Keys,” writes about how pain affects her literary process.

Sonya Huber is the author of five books, including the essay collection Pain Woman Takes Your Keys, and Other Essays from a Nervous System. Her other books include Opa Nobody, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir, The Evolution of Hillary Rodham Clinton and a textbook, The Backwards Research Guide for Writers. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, and other outlets. She teaches at Fairfield University and directs Fairfield’s Low-Residency MFA Program.

NY Times archive: writers on writing for the Times

author Rosellen Brown

Sometimes the only thing that helps when you are a writer is to read other writers’ takes on how this mysterious profession plays out for them. Here is a list of the columns the NY Times has published over the years. Happy reading!

Writers on Writing

I talked to Cheryl Costello of the Brampton Focus

The very exciting fully accessible and intersectional Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD) happens this coming weekend! I couldn’t be more excited. A group of dedicated, generous folks puts this wonder together. Congrats to them, and to every participant. Bon festival, chacun!

I am not able to attend in person, alas, and will miss performing with my skilled colleagues, and meeting readers, but here is a snippet thanks to the Brampton Focus, Cheryl Costello and FOLD:

Counting Down The FOLD: Jane Eaton Hamilton, an interview…

 

There’s a reason we all love The Sun so much, and her name is Lucie Britsch

This great piece from The Sun today, compliments of Tanis MacDonald: a place where I am luckily twice-published. Read it, enjoy it, weep, fall in love with the work of Lucie Britsch.

Kids Today

 

“Celebrating Diversity by Dismantling CanLit” by Amanda Leduc

I love when I learn more about people with whom I’m social media friends–people I notice in special ways, yet when I actually parse our relationship, realize I barely know at all. Here is Amanda Leduc, one of the champions of the Festival of Literary Diversity, on the FOLD Festival, on growing up disabled and trying to find herself in books, on UBCA’s devastation, on privilege, on GritLit (and generally the struggle of festivals to give up privilege, examine their biases and to provide accessibility). I am mentioned here, full disclosure, representing disability rather than with my kin, the big old queers, but what I know is that I’m lucky to be a participant at FOLD this year in any identity. I love the idea of this festival and their fight through the thickets of Canlit so hard.

Thanks, Amanda, for this article.

Celebrating Diversity by Dismantling CanLit

 

 

“Wendy Xu on the Impossible Complexity of Immigrant Love”

Poet Wendy Xu over at Lit Hub and this passage about learning to parse literature:

“My father was my first poetry teacher in all of these ways—he paused to let us wonder together at the power of words. Why was this part so vivid and easy to picture in your head? Why did you cry at this part? Why did you fall in love with this phrase and repeat it over and over? Back then I was just happy to be spending time with my father, but the gift he gave me will last a lifetime.”

I can’t get it out of my head how helpful this training would be for a child who would later become a poet.

“Xu is the author of Phrasis (Fence, 2017, winner of the Ottoline Prize), and You Are Not Dead (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2013). The recipient of a 2014 Ruth Lilly Fellowship, her poetry has appeared in The Best American Poetry, Boston Review, Poetry, A Public Space, and elsewhere, with fiction and essays appearing in BOMB and BuzzFeed. Born in Shandong, China, in 1987, she currently teaches in the Creative Writing MFA Program at Columbia University, and is poetry editor for Hyperallergic.”

Her poem, Notes for an Opening, is here.

The interview with her from which I pulled this quote is here.

Many Gendered Mothers

Ah, but we have a smart and sharp bunch to celebrate over at Many Gendered Mothers, where we publish essays on writers’ mentors. Today Rose Cullis writes on finding and admiring Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts and feeling “…as I read it, I felt a shift in that place where the meanings are.” There is no more you could ask from someone’s work, is there?

Please join us and send us 800 words about your lit hero. We especially welcome submissions from and about marginalized authors.

 

“The Man in the Mirror”

If I have a favourite kind of personal essay, this sharp, beautifully composed, heartfelt piece exemplifies it. Thanks to Rene Denfeld for the rec. “The Man in the Mirror” by Alison Kinney comes highly recommended. So glad I read it.

The Man in the Mirror

Celebrations of Womxn on IWD 2018

In Canada, a woman other than Queen Elizabeth II is finally on our currency in a $10 bill that will go into circulation later this year. Not quite certain of why we can’t replace all the men all at once and for as long as women have been excluded, but I guess it’s a first step. Read all about Viola Desmond, the Black Nova Scotian jailed for sitting in the white section of a movie theatre years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat, here:

Viola Desmond, Canadian hero

_________________

For decades, I read the Globe and Mail daily, and when I turned to the obit section, I would see that in Canada only white heterosexual men ever died, and I’d always breathe a sigh of relief. If they kept on being the only Canadians succumbing, well then, the rest of us might live long enough to see equality. Hope the Globe sees fit to do exactly what the Times is doing:

At the NY Times, obits have been dominated by white men–as selectors, as subjects. Today, they unveil a new column, Overlooked, to redress the problem. I’ve reprinted the introduction here. Follow the links as the stories are fascinating and well worth your investment of time.

Overlooked

Obituary writing is more about life than death: the last word, a testament to a human contribution.

Yet who gets remembered — and how — inherently involves judgment. To look back at the obituary archives can, therefore, be a stark lesson in how society valued various achievements and achievers.

Since 1851, The New York Times has published thousands of obituaries: of heads of state, opera singers, the inventor of Stove Top stuffing and the namer of the Slinky. The vast majority chronicled the lives of men, mostly white ones; even in the last two years, just over one in five of our subjects were female.

Charlotte Brontë wrote “Jane Eyre”; Emily Warren Roebling oversaw construction of the Brooklyn Bridge when her husband fell ill; Madhubala transfixed Bollywood; Ida B. Wells campaigned against lynching. Yet all of their deaths went unremarked in our pages, until now.

Below you’ll find obituaries for these and others who left indelible marks but were nonetheless overlooked. We’ll be adding to this collection each week, as Overlooked becomes a regular feature in the obituaries section, and expanding our lens beyond women.

You can use this form to nominate candidates for future “Overlooked” obits. Read an essay from our obituaries editor about how he approaches subjects and learn more about how the project came to be.”

Books by Writers with Disabilities

I love that slowly, slowly, we build a literature about disabilities written by the disabled themselves. Pain Woman last year by Sonya Huber is one such book. Another is the upcoming Sick by Porochista Khakpour. Dorothy Palmer, well-known for her clear reports/retorts about/to UBCA, has a memoir coming out this very year.

Now here is an interview with author Kim Clark on her book A One-Handed Novel. Her narrator has MS. Can’t wait to read this.

The BBC ignited fury after having 3 able-bodied spouses on to talk about the hell of having spouses with disabilities. I have threatened to write an essay about the hell it is to have an abled spouse.

My novel Weekend with one disabled character and plenty of romance wouldn’t pass my own Bechdel Disability Test, in that it is a romance, and there’s just one character with a disability, but Clark nevertheless recommends it as a good read.

Read Local BC

 

The Last Words for Valentine’s Day

 

If Literature’s “Complicated Men” Were on Tinder by Sarah Chevallier, yonder at McSweeney’s

Now I can die happy, and also in love with Sarah Chevallier.

“Every Time We Put Pen to Paper, It is an Act of Protest:” a Michele Filgate roundtable on silence

“Red Ink is a quarterly series curated and hosted by Michele Filgate, hosted at powerHouse Arena. This dynamic series focuses on women writers, past and present. The name Red Ink brings to mind vitality, blood, correcting history, and making a mark on the world.

The following is an edited transcript from November’s panel, “Silence,” which featured Rene Denfeld, Alisson Wood, T Kira Madden, Gayle Brandeis, and Alexis Okeowo.”

I always admire the speakers at the Red Ink panels, which are generally excerpted for LitHub. This one is particular good. Since I write mostly about the aftermath of trauma, and am writing about it currently in a novel where a character (like one of Rene’s!) has selective mutism, I was particularly riveted. So might you be.

Every Time We Put Pen to Paper, It is an Act of Protest

 

Words for Your 2018 by Louise Erdrich

Advice to Myself by Louise Erdrich

How to Support Your Writer Friend

The care and feeding of the special writer in your life? Is it awkward when they publish a book? What if you haven’t bought it? What if you haven’t read it? Are there expected practices you are violating? You know they suffered getting the thing to press–weren’t they crying on your shoulder a year ago and saying they’d never finish?–and for sure you want to be supportive, but, really, how? What would help?

Here are some tips from Leslie Pietrzyk:

How to Support Your Writer Friend by Leslie Pietrzyk

Ursula–we’ll miss her so. Here she is on being a late bloomer

Oddly, in the way life goes, I was thinking of Ursula Le Guin when the word came through on Twitter that she had died. She was a remarkable writer and thinker, an early protector of women’s rights, and the world will be smaller for her absence.

Ursula K. Le Guin On ‘Starting Late’ as a Writer

“65 Queer and Feminist Books To Read In 2018”

65 Queer and Feminist Books To Read In 2018, a list by Carolyn Yates at Autostraddle. Look at all these lovelies. Why, you’d never have to read a book by any author on that idiotic UBCA list to be edified, shocked, enchanted, moved, transported, renewed, challenged, taught, expanded!

CBC Guide to Writing Contests for Canadians (some international)

We’re lucky when we get a more or less up-to-date list of what’s happening on the contest scene. Here we are for fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry:

CBC Guide to Writing Contests

%d bloggers like this: